West Ashley

Car Window tintingin West Ashley, SC

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number 843-732-4325

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Certified paint protection film installation

Troop Films has been installing paint protection film for over 4 years now, and we are always improving our techniques.

Auto Tint Shop West Ashley, SC

Trust the Troop Car Window
Tinting Difference

 Paint Protection West Ashley, SC

In today's hectic, always-on-the-go world, having a car is essential for transportation around the city. It's hard to imagine life without a car. Without them, you wouldn't be able to make it to work, the grocery store, the laundromat, or important events like your children's sports events. Having a vehicle is a necessity these days because we use them so much, but many car owners don't make strides to protect their investment or what might be inside that investment.

Aside from purchasing an extended warranty for your car, one of the best ways to protect your car is with professional vehicle window tinting in West Ashley, SC. What a warranty won't do, however, is boost curb appeal, reduce sun glare, block harmful radiation, protect your valuables, and provide privacy 24-hours a day.

At Troop Films LLC, we specialize in the finest ceramic window tints and certified paint protection films in South Carolina. We have been installing tints and paint protection film for several years and are always improving our techniques. As true window tinting experts, we have had the pleasure of working on so many different types of vehicles - from multi-million-dollar sports cars to junkers barely worth a grand. Doing so has allowed owner and certified installer Stephon Troop to refine his window tinting game and master techniques like clear bra installation. Today, he has a full-service team behind him, ready and waiting to serve loyal customers just like you.

Unlike some of our competitors, we take meticulous steps to ensure we provide the best work possible on your vehicle. We don't believe in taking shortcuts just to save a few cents. Instead, we go the extra mile to ensure all our customers are satisfied, whether it's completing special request projects or simply taking the time to ensure our work is done right. Whether you own a vintage Ferrari or a busted-up Ford, we aim to provide the highest quality car window tinting around.

When we say we're detail-oriented, we mean it. Here are just a few reasons why customers choose Troop Films for their car window tinting in South Carolina:

  • We remove vehicle parts like blinker covers to ensure dirt and grime aren't trapped.
  • We use computers to make sure your tint or coating is installed properly and precisely.
  • We remove emblems and badges so that we can wrap underneath them, giving your car more protection.
  • We wrap all edges of our ceramic window tints, so your job is seamless, and your tint remains effective year-round.

Curious about how we protect so many cars in South Carolina and the metro West Ashley area? Expertise, customer service, and affordable prices are just the start. Our excellence starts at the top - here are a few words from Troop Films owner, Stephon Troop.

SERVICE AREAS

Meet Your Certified Vehicle Window Tinting Installer

Stephon and his wife, both originally from the chilly state of Pennsylvania, moved to West Ashley, SC, for the warm beach weather and friendly Lowcountry residents.

Though Stephon now has many years of car window tinting under his belt, his training was completed under one of the best car window tint installers in the United States. Installing window tints, paint protection films, and ceramic coatings alongside during this time helped Stephon learn all the techniques and tricks needed to succeed. After training up north, Stephon continued to learn in Texas, where he became a certified paint protection and window tint installer. Since that time, Stephon has mastered even more car protection techniques to offer his customers a comprehensive list of services.

 Auto Tint West Ashley, SC

Car Window Tinting
in West Ashley, SC

Here is a simple truth: not all vehicle window tinting services are equal. Sure, you could spend a few bucks on a DIY window tinting kit, but going this route almost guarantees trouble. From unsightly fading to film bubbles, these offer the bare minimum in protection. With subpar quality, these kits also peel very quickly, causing you to spend more money to re-apply or have your tint professionally installed.

Speaking of window tinting services, few companies in South Carolina combine professional applications with the highest quality window tint film available. That's what sets Troop Films apart from other window tinting businesses - quality film, expert application, meticulous attention to detail, and the best customer service available.

Unlike some of our competitors, we use SunTek ceramic window tinting film, which is among the best in the industry. This technologically advanced product line provides outstanding, top-of-the-line films. With ceramic technology, infrared rejection and solar performance are enhanced, resulting in a non-metal construction that doesn't cause interference with portable or onboard electronic devices.

Our SunTek ceramic tint options come in a range of nine darkness levels. Each shade of tint has an ultra-attractive appearance, is non-reflective, and helps prevent color changes. With this fantastic film, you, your passengers, and your vehicle's interior are protected from 99% of UV rays from the sun. With outstanding infrared and heat rejection properties, your vehicle's interior comfort remains cooler and more comfortable all year long.

 Tint Services West Ashley, SC

Most Common Reasons to Tint
Your Vehicle's Windows

Here are just a few of the most common reasons why South Carolina vehicle owners choose Troop Films for window tinting:

Privacy

Privacy

When we ask our customers why they want to tint their windows, privacy is often first on their list. When you begin to think about it, it makes sense. Why allow other drivers to invade your privacy when you can keep prying eyes off of your identity and personal belongings? It's not unreasonable to want privacy for you and your family while you're driving. You never know who you will pull up next to at a red light, and with our vehicle window tinting services in West Ashley, SC, they don't have to know you either.

Style

Style

There's something inherently cool about having your windows tinted. Even if you're not trying to impress anyone with your car, having your windows tinted helps give it a refined, modern look, which enhances curb appeal. If you're getting tired of the way your car or truck's exterior looks, spice it up a little and bring it into Troop Films for professional window tinting. We think you will be happy with the results.

Comfort

Comfort

Have you ever sat down in your vehicle in the middle of summer, after it's been sitting outside all day? It feels like your car has turned into an oven. Sometimes, it can get so hot in your car that it's hard to grip the steering wheel. As you probably already know, summers in South Carolina can be brutal. When the temperatures heat up in the Lowcountry, your vehicle traps most of that heat, causing interior temperatures to reach unsafe levels. But when you have your windows tinted with Troop Films, your car will stay cooler in the spring and summer. With ceramic film, glare from headlights and streetlights is also reduced, meaning you can see easier without having to strain your eyes. More comfort and more safety - what's not to love?

Health and Safety

Health and Safety

When you think about car window tinting, most folks don't think about the health and safety benefits involved. But when it comes to you and your passengers, safety should be top of your list. High temps in your vehicle, usually caused by UV rays, are a safety concern not only for your skin and eyes but for your car's safety mechanisms. This is especially true for your airbags, which can be damaged and left inoperable when interior temperatures are high enough. Obviously, that's a huge safety risk.

Fading Dashboard

Fading Dashboard

Over time, your vehicle's dashboard will take a beating when your car is left out in the sun. The combo of harmful UV rays and high heat can ruin dashboard materials, leaving them cracked, faded, and in need of repair. Fixing your dashboard can be a costly endeavor. However, doing so can be avoided with high-quality ceramic tints from Troop Films.

 Ceramic Window Tint West Ashley, SC

Certified Installer

Benefits of Vehicle Window Tinting
in West Ashley, SC

If you're still on the fence about ceramic window tinting for your vehicle, consider
the following benefits of our SunTek films:

 Ceramic Coatings West Ashley, SC
  • Unrestricted Communications - some window films contain traces of metals, which can cause interference with devices. Our metal-free films won't interfere with your cell phone, GPS, satellite radio, or other electronic devices that you use while driving.
  • Resistant to Color Changes - Our technologically-advanced window films are scientifically created to give you an attractive, non-reflective appearance without color fading.
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty - You read that right - when you buy window tints from Troop Films, your products are covered by the manufacturer against peeling, adhesive failures, changes in color, cracking, and delamination. Some restrictions do apply.
  • Precise Installation - When you work with Troop Films, you can have peace of mind knowing your window tint will be applied seamlessly and accurately. That's because we have access to core pattern-cutting software that trims your window film tightly. With our precise installation, you can rest easy knowing your tint will fit the make, model, and year of your vehicle like a glove.

The Ultimate Protection: Car
Window Tinting and Paint
Protection Film in West Ashley, SC

They say the first cut is always the deepest, and that's certainly true when it comes to your vehicle. Few things are as frustrating as getting out of your car, only to realize that a stray rock has dented your favorite car or truck. Dents and scratches from road debris like rocks and even acids from bugs all take their toll on your vehicle's overall appearance and value. Along with UV rays, "road rash" from winter salt, sand, rocks, pebbles, branches, and more will compromise your vehicle's integrity and can mean lower resale value.

If you're looking for total protection from heat and UV rays as well as road debris, we recommend car window tinting in West Ashley, SC along with our paint protection film application. Paint protection film, also called your vehicle's clear bra, provides a shield of protection from road rash, preserves your car's paint job, increases its longevity, and can increase its resale value. Paint protection film is very useful for everyday use, especially if you're driving on the highway or simply want to protect your favorite car. Clear bras are also helpful for work vehicles, which often receive dents and scratches due to the nature of their work.

At Troop Film, our SunTek paint protection film is among the highest quality films in the industry. Common application areas include:

  • Vehicle Paint
  • Door Handles
  • Headlights
  • Rear Fenders
  • Front Bumpers
  • Mirrors
  • Hoods
 PPF West Ashley, SC

Our paint protection films are completely reinvented products that merge the hydrophobicity of ceramic with premium, self-healing paint protection film. Common benefits of having your vehicle protected with paint film include:

01

Endurance

Your car's finish will stay flawless and fresh with our car protection films, which shield against salt, rocks, insects, and other debris.

02

Resistance

Our HydroResist top-coat protection boosts your vehicle's stain resistance by limiting dirt and water accumulation on your protection film's surface.

03

Self-Healing

It sounds too good to be true, but our films really do heal themselves by using the heat from the sun or your vehicle's engine.

04

Look Great

Our paint protection films are available in high gloss and matte finishes, leaving your car with outstanding optics and clarity.

Have Questions? We've Got Answers!

In addition to the highest-quality car window tinting products, our customer service team excels at answering any questions you may have. We're here to help in any way and can even help determine which kind of protection is best for your vehicle. Call, text, or fill out the inquiry form on our website. Before you know it, your car will be super-stylish and even safer to drive with the help of Troop Films LLC.

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Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Charleston Stage Adopts 2-Person Leadership Structure

CHARLESTON, S.C.: Charleston Stage has announced the appointment of a new executive leadership team consisting of a managing director and artistic director, to be instated when founder and producing artistic director Julian Wiles retires in May 2023. Former associate artistic director Marybeth Clark has been selected as the artistic director designee; she will oversee the artistic aspects of the c...

CHARLESTON, S.C.: Charleston Stage has announced the appointment of a new executive leadership team consisting of a managing director and artistic director, to be instated when founder and producing artistic director Julian Wiles retires in May 2023. Former associate artistic director Marybeth Clark has been selected as the artistic director designee; she will oversee the artistic aspects of the company while the managing director oversees finances, marketing, and development. The managing director position has yet to be filled.

Marybeth Clark has been with Charleston Stage for 23 years, beginning as director of education and becoming associate artistic director in 1998. Serving as director, actor, educator, and administrator, Clark has helped launch and manage the company’s resident professional acting company, the creation of the West Ashley Theatre Center and Pearl Theatre, as well as overseeing the launch of Charleston Stage’s new CityStage community performance and educational programming. She has directed over 60 productions, including Mamma Mia!, Elf The Musical, Of Mice and Men, and this past spring’s production of Kinky Boots.

Since founding the company in 1979, Julian Wiles has produced and/or directed more than 350 productions, in addition to writing over 40 original plays and musicals for the company, including Gershwin at Folly, The Seat of Justice, and this coming season’s JFK and Inga Binga. Wiles was named a distinguished alumnus at UNC Chapel Hill in 2021, was inducted into the SC Theatre Association’s Hall of Fame in 2018, received the 2010 Governor’s Award for the Arts, received a Special Recognition Award in 2004 from the Charleston NAACP for his work on The Seat of Justice and received the National Youth Theatre Director’s Award in 1988.

“I am very grateful for the generosity of our patrons, donors, and the entire Charleston community over the years,” said Wiles in a statement. “Their support has made it possible for Charleston Stage to continue to expand its artistic horizons, and I look forward in the coming year and in the years to come in supporting Marybeth Clark, our artistic director, designee, and our upcoming new managing director once that candidate is selected. I have no doubt they will bring their own unique perspectives and imaginative creative vision to the work of Charleston Stage as they lead the company into the next phase of Charleston Stage’s artistic growth and evolution.”

Upon his retirement at the conclusion of the company’s 45th season, Wiles will become director emeritus and will continue to be involved with the company in a limited capacity, directing one or two shows a season and being available to consult with new leadership as requested.

The board of trustees has enlisted president of Management Consultants for the Arts David Mallette to conduct a national search for the new managing director. Valerie Morris, Charleston Stage board member and retired dean of the College of Charleston School of the Arts, will chair the search committee. They intend to fill the position by January 2023.

Charleston Stage is South Carolina’s largest professional theatre company, in residence at the historic Dock Street Theatre. The nonprofit company has presented over 150 productions, has premiered more than 30 new plays and musicals, and employs 33 full-time staff members, guest artists, performers, and high school apprentices. As of 2020, Charleston Stage had a budget of $2.7 million.

Support American Theatre: a just and thriving theatre ecology begins with information for all. Please join us in this mission by making a donation to our publisher, Theatre Communications Group. When you support American Theatre magazine and TCG, you support a long legacy of quality nonprofit arts journalism. Click here to make your fully tax-deductible donation today!

Charleston retailer buys adjacent shop for $3.25M; new eatery coming to West Ashley

A downtown Charleston women’s apparel retailer recently bought an adjacent building that once housed another clothing shop and now has a satellite operation on the upper peninsula as part of its expanded footprint.An affiliate of Hampden Clothing, owned by Stacy Smallwood, purchased the former Anne’s women’s clothing shop at 312 King St. for $3.25 million in November, according to Charleston County land records.It serves as an extension to Hampden’s flag...

A downtown Charleston women’s apparel retailer recently bought an adjacent building that once housed another clothing shop and now has a satellite operation on the upper peninsula as part of its expanded footprint.

An affiliate of Hampden Clothing, owned by Stacy Smallwood, purchased the former Anne’s women’s clothing shop at 312 King St. for $3.25 million in November, according to Charleston County land records.

It serves as an extension to Hampden’s flagship store at 314 King and its counterpart shoe store James next door.

The apparel store has been growing its presence on the peninsula in recent years. It now occupies more than 10,000 square feet of retail space on middle King, including Small by Hampden at 324 King.

The retailer also recently leased the former Barrie Newman Building at 747 Meeting St., according to the commercial real estate firm NAI Charleston.

The retailer will use the 7,200-square-foot rental space as an e-commerce and distribution office to focus on the company’s growing online business. Special events, such as partnerships with brands, also are planned at the site for shoppers.

The newly leased property in the area called NoMo, for North Morrison, backs up to the planned Lowcountry Lowline linear park that will run along the peninsula’s spine. The site also is close to Interstate 26 and offers on-site, off-street parking.

“The iconic building is a perfect fit for the internationally recognized boutique,” said Sarah Shelley, of NAI Charleston, who represented Hampden Clothing LLC as the tenant.

Jack Owens, also of NAI Charleston, represented the building owner, AD Meeting LLC, which paid $2.25 million for the property in December 2020, according to land records.

What’s cooking?

A new dessert-type eatery is in the works for West Ashley.

Big Dough Daddy LLC recently leased 1,581 square feet at 3863 West Ashley Circle, off Bees Ferry Road, according to the commercial real estate firms Avison Young and Bridge Corporate Solutions.

The venture will be called Cookie Dough Bliss & Creamery and will offer cookies, cookie dough, ice cream and other treats, according to owner Jason Keyser of West Ashley.

An opening is tentatively planned for April or May. His partner, Kitty McDowell, will be the general manager. She previously worked at the creamery’s location in North Carolina.

The Concord, N.C.-based company has 11 locations in eight states. The West Ashley site will be its first in South Carolina.

On the way

A five-building commercial complex is the newest proposal for a developing area in Cainhoy.

The planned Foundation Place at Point Hope on Clements Ferry Road north of the Publix-anchored Point Hope Commons Shopping Center will include 38,000 square feet of retail, restaurant and office space on about 4.5 acres.

Plans call for 22,000 square feet of office, retail and fast-casual restaurant space, including a coffee shop with a drive-thru, as well as a 16,000-square-foot, two-story medical office building, according to site plans.

Three buildings are slated to be 6,000 square feet each while another with the drive-thru window will be 4,000 square feet.

The developer is listed as Vulcan Property Group of Fort Mill, which is building the new 25,000-square-foot Serendipity Labs co-working structure in Nexton in Summerville. The co-working space is expected to open during the summer.

Stretching out

The Charleston franchise owner of a new Chicago-based fitness firm is planning four more locations across the Lowcountry after launching his first operation earlier this month in southern Mount Pleasant.

Franchisee John Youngblood said he plans to open Spenga fitness sites in northern Mount Pleasant, James Island, the Summerville area and West Ashley. Specific locations and opening schedules have not been determined.

Youngblood opened the initial Spenga site in a 4,000-square-foot space at 996 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. in the Publix-anchored Queensborough Shopping Center in Mount Pleasant on Jan. 8. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Jan. 18.

Spenga combines spin, strength training and yoga.

Dead vultures found in West Ashley positive for avian flu, cannot be removed

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7....

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.

Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7.

“We had friends come over, who had a golf cart, and we took a ride back here and saw dozens of dead ones,” Carlo recalled.

He reported it to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), which took samples from the birds on May 10.

“DHEC advised me to get the word out best I could to keep children and pets away from the area,” Carlo said.

Health officials said avian flu can spread through any contact with the birds, as well as through their feathers or fecal material. However, the risk of people or pets contracting the virus is considered low.

“Anytime it does happen, that’s when we call it a novel flu strain – or novel infection – anytime it goes from animal host to human host,” said Jonathan Knoche, a DHEC public health physician.

Will Dillman, SCDNR assistant chief of wildlife, said direct sunlight and summer heat help kill the virus.

“As the weather heats up this should be less prevalent and run its course,” he said.

Almost a month after the dead vultures were first reported, Carlo said they are still losing two or three vultures a day, and more than 20 carcasses still sit in the neighborhood.

Now, he wants to know who will get rid of all the carcasses surrounding the retention ponds where people walk their dogs and children play.

“There’s other diseases I’m sure will come along from all these dead birds, not to mention they are bringing other animals around that would be feeding off of them,” said Carlo.

Both SCDNR and DHEC said there is nothing they can do to remove the dead birds.

“Moving those carcasses around to other places has the potential to spread that [avian flu] around,” said Dillman.

Carlo said he is working with his homeowner’s association to remove the carcasses to keep his family and neighbors safe.

The Count on 2 Investigators did reach out to the HOA property manager to see what other avenues they are taking since SCDNR and DHEC will not remove the dead vultures.

We have yet to hear back.

Plan approved to replace West Ashley middle school to reduce capacity

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.

At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.

The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy for Comprehensive Education (PACE) to fund the design and construction of its facilities on the North campus. PACE is a specialty charter school run by a non-profit for students with multiple disabilities. They’re currently operating out of the former St. Andrews Middle School location.

The board committee also approved the expansion of the seventh/eighth grade C.E. Williams South campus by adding eight classrooms.

Despite the new building for sixth-grade students, the district’s plan does not expand capacity. The current building is underutilized with an enrollment of 363 this year. The building capacity is 904 according to data presented at the meeting.

The new building will be built to hold 600 students, with an expansion capacity of 900. This stands in stark contrast to the South campus which is nearing capacity. That building holds 969 students and currently has 835 students.

However, the district contends West Ashley is not growing as fast as it appears. If current projections remain unchanged the North campus is not expected to exceed 431 students in the next six years. The South campus is expected to peak at 848 students over the same time period.

Former West Ashley High School principal Lee Runyon says the district says the district’s plan is not properly taking into account growth in West Ashley.

“I think that the current plan is again short-sighted and smacks of continued use of taxpayer dollars to try and put a Band-Aid on the problem of systemic growth,” Runyon said. “Anytime you’re running an organization, you’re either growing or you’re dying. If the district is projecting flatline growth in a community that is exploding with residential growth, I think that’s poor leadership.”

Parents like Ragan DuBose-Morris say there are plenty of kids in West Ashley, but many parents are opting to send their middle schoolers out of District 10 to seek out more traditional options.

“West Ashley is the only area in Charleston County that does not have a traditional K-12 pipeline so that you can attend at a traditional elementary, middle and high school configuration,” DuBose-Morris said. “That has been a problem.”

The district’s own numbers suggest only 65 percent of students living in West Ashley attend the two campuses. Despite living in West Ashley, DuBose-Morris chooses to take her children to schools in North Charleston. She says whenever a child has to move to a new school there’s a transitional period that disrupts education. She says she wants to eliminate as many of those transitions as possible.

“They [children] have the knowledge of being in an environment for six through 12th grade,” DuBose-Morris said. “So we have stability, they’re not transitioning between schools. The guidance counselors know who they are. Their teachers know who they are. They’re able to progress through a process in which they have support.”

The current configuration was initiated in part to produce more diverse schools. Constituent board chair for District 10 (West Ashley) Rodney Lewis says the schools are now more diverse and the sixth-grade academy model can work. He says the smaller classes away from the influence of older students are helpful for students to enter adolescents.

“Any time there’s a new program it never just jumps off the first two or three years,” Lewis said. “You got to work it. It’s like a business. You start a business you won’t go to the top automatically. You have to grow there. Allow this to grow and you will see how it works.”

The project is part of the Phase Five Capital Buildings Program that is being funded by a one percent sales tax approved by voters in 2020. The project is budgeted for $40 million and is expected to be completed in 2026.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

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