Wadmalaw Island

Car Window tintingin Wadmalaw Island, SC

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number 843-732-4325

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Certified paint protection film installation

Troop Films has been installing paint protection film for over 4 years now, and we are always improving our techniques.

Auto Tint Shop Wadmalaw Island, SC

Trust the Troop Car Window
Tinting Difference

 Paint Protection Wadmalaw Island, SC

In today's hectic, always-on-the-go world, having a car is essential for transportation around the city. It's hard to imagine life without a car. Without them, you wouldn't be able to make it to work, the grocery store, the laundromat, or important events like your children's sports events. Having a vehicle is a necessity these days because we use them so much, but many car owners don't make strides to protect their investment or what might be inside that investment.

Aside from purchasing an extended warranty for your car, one of the best ways to protect your car is with professional vehicle window tinting in Wadmalaw Island, SC. What a warranty won't do, however, is boost curb appeal, reduce sun glare, block harmful radiation, protect your valuables, and provide privacy 24-hours a day.

At Troop Films LLC, we specialize in the finest ceramic window tints and certified paint protection films in South Carolina. We have been installing tints and paint protection film for several years and are always improving our techniques. As true window tinting experts, we have had the pleasure of working on so many different types of vehicles - from multi-million-dollar sports cars to junkers barely worth a grand. Doing so has allowed owner and certified installer Stephon Troop to refine his window tinting game and master techniques like clear bra installation. Today, he has a full-service team behind him, ready and waiting to serve loyal customers just like you.

Unlike some of our competitors, we take meticulous steps to ensure we provide the best work possible on your vehicle. We don't believe in taking shortcuts just to save a few cents. Instead, we go the extra mile to ensure all our customers are satisfied, whether it's completing special request projects or simply taking the time to ensure our work is done right. Whether you own a vintage Ferrari or a busted-up Ford, we aim to provide the highest quality car window tinting around.

When we say we're detail-oriented, we mean it. Here are just a few reasons why customers choose Troop Films for their car window tinting in South Carolina:

  • We remove vehicle parts like blinker covers to ensure dirt and grime aren't trapped.
  • We use computers to make sure your tint or coating is installed properly and precisely.
  • We remove emblems and badges so that we can wrap underneath them, giving your car more protection.
  • We wrap all edges of our ceramic window tints, so your job is seamless, and your tint remains effective year-round.

Curious about how we protect so many cars in South Carolina and the metro Wadmalaw Island area? Expertise, customer service, and affordable prices are just the start. Our excellence starts at the top - here are a few words from Troop Films owner, Stephon Troop.

SERVICE AREAS

Meet Your Certified Vehicle Window Tinting Installer

Stephon and his wife, both originally from the chilly state of Pennsylvania, moved to Wadmalaw Island, SC, for the warm beach weather and friendly Lowcountry residents.

Though Stephon now has many years of car window tinting under his belt, his training was completed under one of the best car window tint installers in the United States. Installing window tints, paint protection films, and ceramic coatings alongside during this time helped Stephon learn all the techniques and tricks needed to succeed. After training up north, Stephon continued to learn in Texas, where he became a certified paint protection and window tint installer. Since that time, Stephon has mastered even more car protection techniques to offer his customers a comprehensive list of services.

 Auto Tint Wadmalaw Island, SC

Car Window Tinting
in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Here is a simple truth: not all vehicle window tinting services are equal. Sure, you could spend a few bucks on a DIY window tinting kit, but going this route almost guarantees trouble. From unsightly fading to film bubbles, these offer the bare minimum in protection. With subpar quality, these kits also peel very quickly, causing you to spend more money to re-apply or have your tint professionally installed.

Speaking of window tinting services, few companies in South Carolina combine professional applications with the highest quality window tint film available. That's what sets Troop Films apart from other window tinting businesses - quality film, expert application, meticulous attention to detail, and the best customer service available.

Unlike some of our competitors, we use SunTek ceramic window tinting film, which is among the best in the industry. This technologically advanced product line provides outstanding, top-of-the-line films. With ceramic technology, infrared rejection and solar performance are enhanced, resulting in a non-metal construction that doesn't cause interference with portable or onboard electronic devices.

Our SunTek ceramic tint options come in a range of nine darkness levels. Each shade of tint has an ultra-attractive appearance, is non-reflective, and helps prevent color changes. With this fantastic film, you, your passengers, and your vehicle's interior are protected from 99% of UV rays from the sun. With outstanding infrared and heat rejection properties, your vehicle's interior comfort remains cooler and more comfortable all year long.

 Tint Services Wadmalaw Island, SC

Most Common Reasons to Tint
Your Vehicle's Windows

Here are just a few of the most common reasons why South Carolina vehicle owners choose Troop Films for window tinting:

Privacy

Privacy

When we ask our customers why they want to tint their windows, privacy is often first on their list. When you begin to think about it, it makes sense. Why allow other drivers to invade your privacy when you can keep prying eyes off of your identity and personal belongings? It's not unreasonable to want privacy for you and your family while you're driving. You never know who you will pull up next to at a red light, and with our vehicle window tinting services in Wadmalaw Island, SC, they don't have to know you either.

Style

Style

There's something inherently cool about having your windows tinted. Even if you're not trying to impress anyone with your car, having your windows tinted helps give it a refined, modern look, which enhances curb appeal. If you're getting tired of the way your car or truck's exterior looks, spice it up a little and bring it into Troop Films for professional window tinting. We think you will be happy with the results.

Comfort

Comfort

Have you ever sat down in your vehicle in the middle of summer, after it's been sitting outside all day? It feels like your car has turned into an oven. Sometimes, it can get so hot in your car that it's hard to grip the steering wheel. As you probably already know, summers in South Carolina can be brutal. When the temperatures heat up in the Lowcountry, your vehicle traps most of that heat, causing interior temperatures to reach unsafe levels. But when you have your windows tinted with Troop Films, your car will stay cooler in the spring and summer. With ceramic film, glare from headlights and streetlights is also reduced, meaning you can see easier without having to strain your eyes. More comfort and more safety - what's not to love?

Health and Safety

Health and Safety

When you think about car window tinting, most folks don't think about the health and safety benefits involved. But when it comes to you and your passengers, safety should be top of your list. High temps in your vehicle, usually caused by UV rays, are a safety concern not only for your skin and eyes but for your car's safety mechanisms. This is especially true for your airbags, which can be damaged and left inoperable when interior temperatures are high enough. Obviously, that's a huge safety risk.

Fading Dashboard

Fading Dashboard

Over time, your vehicle's dashboard will take a beating when your car is left out in the sun. The combo of harmful UV rays and high heat can ruin dashboard materials, leaving them cracked, faded, and in need of repair. Fixing your dashboard can be a costly endeavor. However, doing so can be avoided with high-quality ceramic tints from Troop Films.

 Ceramic Window Tint Wadmalaw Island, SC

Certified Installer

Benefits of Vehicle Window Tinting
in Wadmalaw Island, SC

If you're still on the fence about ceramic window tinting for your vehicle, consider
the following benefits of our SunTek films:

 Ceramic Coatings Wadmalaw Island, SC
  • Unrestricted Communications - some window films contain traces of metals, which can cause interference with devices. Our metal-free films won't interfere with your cell phone, GPS, satellite radio, or other electronic devices that you use while driving.
  • Resistant to Color Changes - Our technologically-advanced window films are scientifically created to give you an attractive, non-reflective appearance without color fading.
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty - You read that right - when you buy window tints from Troop Films, your products are covered by the manufacturer against peeling, adhesive failures, changes in color, cracking, and delamination. Some restrictions do apply.
  • Precise Installation - When you work with Troop Films, you can have peace of mind knowing your window tint will be applied seamlessly and accurately. That's because we have access to core pattern-cutting software that trims your window film tightly. With our precise installation, you can rest easy knowing your tint will fit the make, model, and year of your vehicle like a glove.

The Ultimate Protection: Car
Window Tinting and Paint
Protection Film in Wadmalaw Island, SC

They say the first cut is always the deepest, and that's certainly true when it comes to your vehicle. Few things are as frustrating as getting out of your car, only to realize that a stray rock has dented your favorite car or truck. Dents and scratches from road debris like rocks and even acids from bugs all take their toll on your vehicle's overall appearance and value. Along with UV rays, "road rash" from winter salt, sand, rocks, pebbles, branches, and more will compromise your vehicle's integrity and can mean lower resale value.

If you're looking for total protection from heat and UV rays as well as road debris, we recommend car window tinting in Wadmalaw Island, SC along with our paint protection film application. Paint protection film, also called your vehicle's clear bra, provides a shield of protection from road rash, preserves your car's paint job, increases its longevity, and can increase its resale value. Paint protection film is very useful for everyday use, especially if you're driving on the highway or simply want to protect your favorite car. Clear bras are also helpful for work vehicles, which often receive dents and scratches due to the nature of their work.

At Troop Film, our SunTek paint protection film is among the highest quality films in the industry. Common application areas include:

  • Vehicle Paint
  • Door Handles
  • Headlights
  • Rear Fenders
  • Front Bumpers
  • Mirrors
  • Hoods
 PPF Wadmalaw Island, SC

Our paint protection films are completely reinvented products that merge the hydrophobicity of ceramic with premium, self-healing paint protection film. Common benefits of having your vehicle protected with paint film include:

01

Endurance

Your car's finish will stay flawless and fresh with our car protection films, which shield against salt, rocks, insects, and other debris.

02

Resistance

Our HydroResist top-coat protection boosts your vehicle's stain resistance by limiting dirt and water accumulation on your protection film's surface.

03

Self-Healing

It sounds too good to be true, but our films really do heal themselves by using the heat from the sun or your vehicle's engine.

04

Look Great

Our paint protection films are available in high gloss and matte finishes, leaving your car with outstanding optics and clarity.

Have Questions? We've Got Answers!

In addition to the highest-quality car window tinting products, our customer service team excels at answering any questions you may have. We're here to help in any way and can even help determine which kind of protection is best for your vehicle. Call, text, or fill out the inquiry form on our website. Before you know it, your car will be super-stylish and even safer to drive with the help of Troop Films LLC.

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Latest News in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Kiawah Island real estate investment firm to build golf course on 885-acre Johns Is. tract

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential project locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an ou...

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential project locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.

South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an outdoor sporting site by the private club.

The land use allows for a golf course and associated amenities as well as residential development, said Chris Randolph, a South Street partner. He said plans are still evolving for the site, and it hasn’t been determined how many homes will be part of the Orange Hill development.

The golf course will take up about 300 acres.

Part of the property is in a planned unit development through Charleston County that allows 181 home sites, a golf course, clubhouse, pro shop, amenity center and about 212 acres of preserved land.

“We are working with the county and other constituents on Johns Island for a plan that everyone is happy with,” said Randolph, whose firm is headquartered in Charleston and Charlotte.

A representative of the Johns Island Community Association did not immediately respond for comment on the proposed development.

He hopes to start development of the as-yet unnamed layout next year, followed by 12 to 18 months of construction. He also said it was too early to provide a cost estimate for the course, which will be one of the few to be built in South Carolina in recent years.

Randolph said the course would provide members with an additional golfing option and take some of the playing pressure off of the club’s two existing layouts, Cassique and the River Course, where usage has increased sharply during the pandemic. The average member played 40 more rounds in 2021 than in 2019, according to South Street.

“We think there is a new market of people who have recently moved to Charleston who would have an interest in joining a golf club like this given its proximity to the city and especially since it offers members access to the rest of the Kiawah Island Club amenities,” Randolph said.

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The course will be designed by Beau Welling of Greenville, who previously worked with River Course designer Tom Fazio. Welling also is partners with Tiger Woods in the golfing great’s golf course design business.

The vision for the new course is to create a playing experience that looks like it could have been crafted more than 100 years ago, according to South Street. It will be built around grand live oaks and feature “undulating fairways ... and Old World slopes and contours.”

The company’s future plans for Kiawah include additional residential development as well as the opening of the oceanfront Cape Club adjacent to The Cape on Kiawah, a condominium development on the sea island’s western end. The Cape Club is expected to break ground in August.

South Street also recently acquired the 131-year-old Two Meeting Street Inn on the Charleston peninsula for nearly $7.7 million. It will be refurbished and become an overnight accommodation for Kiawah Island Club members when it reopens in 2023.

Randolph said raising the money for the golf course and other developments was challenging during the pandemic but the effort attracted “outsized investor demand” because of “compelling opportunities.”

South Street Partners’ other investments from the fund include the acquisition and development of the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community in Bluffton near Hilton Head Island.

The company also has its sights set on other resort properties across the Southeast from south of Washington, D.C., to Florida and west to Texas.

“We are continuing to look for opportunities,” Randolph said.

Those could include existing properties or new developments.

South Street also owns The Cliffs communities across the mountains of South Carolina and North Carolina as well as The Residences at Salamander in Virginia.

Upcoming Johns Island restaurant will serve ‘traditional meets modern’ Mexican fare

Chef Alex Yellan is nearing the opening of what he hopes will be his dream Mexican restaurant.Named Colectivo, the destination at 2901 Maybank Highway will cater to a local Johns Island crowd, serving Mexican food that Yellan himself craves — dishes you might actually find in Mexico, perhaps with a cheffy twist.“I think for me that’s one of the things that’s most exciting, is having the chance to cook for a larger portion of locals,” Yellan said. “It’ll be cool to be a part of that grow...

Chef Alex Yellan is nearing the opening of what he hopes will be his dream Mexican restaurant.

Named Colectivo, the destination at 2901 Maybank Highway will cater to a local Johns Island crowd, serving Mexican food that Yellan himself craves — dishes you might actually find in Mexico, perhaps with a cheffy twist.

“I think for me that’s one of the things that’s most exciting, is having the chance to cook for a larger portion of locals,” Yellan said. “It’ll be cool to be a part of that growing Johns Island crowd out there.”

Born in Arizona, Yellan spent a summer living with a family in Mexico during college, taking residence there again in his 20s with a former co-worker. Colectivo’s menu will be influenced by this experience and techniques he learned throughout his career in professional kitchens.

“We’re trying to find that line between traditional and modern,” Yellan said. “Mexican food is living and breathing just like any other cuisine.”

After leaving his post as executive chef at downtown Charleston wine bar The Tippling House, Yellan started testing out Colectivo dishes at a friend’s house. Carnitas ribs, shrimp cócteles, bone marrow birria sopes, cochinita pibil and potatoes with Edam cheese are a handful of dishes that could land on the forthcoming restaurant’s menu, which will feature a mix of small plates and larger mains.

Colectivo’s tacos and burritos won’t arrive as they do in other Charleston restaurants. Similar to a barbecue restaurant, meats will be served by the pound along with sides and stacks of house-made tortillas.

The idea is to share among the table.

“You’re going to see the chef on some plates, but when it comes to the meats, I’m kind of over the idea of doing the chef-curated taco,” Yellan said. “What we just want to have is really nicely cooked meats with their garnish and their salsa and everyone’s grabbing at it and enjoying that family-style.”

Mexican meats and sides aren’t the only thing that will be shared at Colectivo, which will open for dinner Wednesdays through Saturdays. On Mondays and Tuesdays, Yellan will lend the 75-seat venue to former Xiao Bao Biscuit colleague Jamey Fairchild, who will serve food from his Gingerbug pop-up. Guests who visit on those nights can expect Thai curries and charcoal-grilled snacks.

Colectivo is targeting a fall opening. Before the restaurant debuts, Yellan plans to host a series of pop-ups starting in August.

Charleston County zoning proposal could limit public input surrounding mitigation banks

Wadmalaw Island residents and environmentalists are concerned that zoning changes proposed by Charleston County might slash the public process used to alter wetland boundaries and the vegetated buffers meant to protect them.For some time now, the county has had in place a 35-foot setback buffer on the so-called critical line that keeps impact away from marsh areas. To be able to encroach on that buffer for reasons such as adding a pool, deck or to excavate, owners would have to argue a hardship before the Board of Zoning Appeals, whic...

Wadmalaw Island residents and environmentalists are concerned that zoning changes proposed by Charleston County might slash the public process used to alter wetland boundaries and the vegetated buffers meant to protect them.

For some time now, the county has had in place a 35-foot setback buffer on the so-called critical line that keeps impact away from marsh areas. To be able to encroach on that buffer for reasons such as adding a pool, deck or to excavate, owners would have to argue a hardship before the Board of Zoning Appeals, which determines if a zoning variance is warranted.

But a proposed ordinance passed by County Council on first reading July 12 would give the zoning and planning director permission to make that determination for the creation of a mitigation bank.

Some critics say the move is related to the stalled mitigation bank planned on Wadmalaw Island and that it would cut out the public review process used to make these types of decisions.

The recent history dates to April 4 when county’s Board of Zoning Appeals denied two variance requests for the planned mitigation bank. Point Farm Investors LLC wanted the board to approve the removal of a grand live oak tree and allow encroachment into 1.3 acres of protected buffer next to tidal land.

The board voted unanimously to deny the requests because the property could still be used without variances.

But Mary Shahid, an attorney who represented the bank, said it could not be opened without zoning permissions, citing the need to breach berms that block tidal flow from coming in.

At a meeting later that month, County Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt asked for clarification on “what zoning amendments might need to be made to address any of that.”

Point Farm is being represented by American Mitigation Co., whose president, Ross Nelson, sits on the BZA and was appointed by Honeycutt.

The bank has appealed the decision in circuit court. But if the county changes the zoning ordinance, Point Farm can withdraw the appeal and reapply under the new rule “and it would be a staff approval and not a public approval,” Jason Crowley, Coastal Conservation League’s communities and transportation senior program director, said recently.

The county has a method for public notification.

Charleston County Zoning and Planning Director Joel Evans said there is a standing “parties of interest” list that people can join to be notified when an application for a house, a site plan review or something similar is submitted for a particular property. This process is applicable for decisions that are made administratively.

“We have several of those around where people just want to be notified,” Evans said. “They formally requested that we can put it in our system and notify them.”

There’s no “mass mail-out,” Evans said, but whoever alerts the county that they want to be notified, can be.

He said the county is also willing to put people on the list to be alerted when an application is submitted for a mitigation bank on a piece of property.

But there’s a difference between public notice and public input, said Councilman Dickie Schweers.

If Evans were to make an administrative decision regarding a mitigation bank, the only way an interested party could do anything about it would be through an appeal, which comes with a cost.

The council voted 5-3 to pass first reading of the ordinance July 12.

Council members Anna Johnson, Kylon Middleton and Schweers voted against the proposal; Councilman Henry Darby was absent.

“It seems like we’re being asked to sort of bail out a process that didn’t play out the way, obviously, the developer was planning for it to,” Councilman Robert Wehrman said.

He said he is open to hearing out the conversation regarding the ordinance.

The council can amend the proposal up until third reading.

Clemson experts predict watermelon production about to get more expensive

BLACKVILLE, S.C. -- During the 2022 Clemson University Watermelon Field Day, growers learned overuse of tebuconazole has resulted in resistance in watermelons and other cucurbits leaving growers to rely on more expensive alternatives to treat their crops.Tebuconazole is an ingredient found in several fungicide products and is used to treat fungal and disease problems such as gummy stem blight, leaf spots and anthracnose. It was first used in 2008 and has been applied frequently to watermelon and other cucurbit crops since that time. N...

BLACKVILLE, S.C. -- During the 2022 Clemson University Watermelon Field Day, growers learned overuse of tebuconazole has resulted in resistance in watermelons and other cucurbits leaving growers to rely on more expensive alternatives to treat their crops.

Tebuconazole is an ingredient found in several fungicide products and is used to treat fungal and disease problems such as gummy stem blight, leaf spots and anthracnose. It was first used in 2008 and has been applied frequently to watermelon and other cucurbit crops since that time. Now, gummy stem blight is beginning to show resistance to tebuconazole.

Clemson Research and Cooperative Extension Service vegetable pathologist Tony Keinath said he “…knew this day was coming,” adding watermelon production is about to get a little more expensive.

“One reason we’re where we are today is because tebuconazole is less costly to use and we’ve used it a lot on our watermelons,” said Keinath, who is located at Clemson’s Coastal Research and Education Center (REC). “Watermelon and other cucurbit growers should reduce the use of tebuconazole to manage gummy stem blight as the fungus has become moderately resistant to this very commonly used fungicide.”

Symptoms of gummy stem blight are large, round spots on the edges of leaves and dry cankers on main stems. Tebuconazole-resistance has been found in South Carolina and Georgia watermelon crops. Alternatives include applying mancozeb and chlorothalonil early in the season and Inspire Super and Miravis Prime later in the season. For more information, read the Clemson 2022 Watermelon Fungicide Guide. The field day was held at the Edisto REC in Blackville, South Carolina.

Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist located at the Coastal REC, addresses using anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) to manage soilborne diseases.Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist, addresses using ASD to manage soilborne diseases.

In addition to gummy stem blight, diseases and weeds also present problems for watermelon growers. Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist also located at the Coastal REC, addressed using anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) to manage soilborne diseases. This strategy was first developed in Japan in 2000 as an alternative management strategy to soil fumigation and involves applying organic matter (carbon source) to soil, followed by irrigation, to create an environment toxic to diseases, nematodes, weeds and insect pests.

Despite its positive effects on agriculture, ASD is not widely used, mainly because of high carbon-source costs. Cutulle is leading a study of researchers who plan to develop methods to identify agricultural carbon waste streams for promoting the use of ASD.

In addition to high carbon costs, using ASD in watermelon presents other challenges including maintaining proper soil health. Bhupinder Farmaha, Clemson Extension nutrient management specialist at the Edisto REC, is studying how carbon sources affect soil health to determine sustainable practices for using ASD in watermelon.

Angela Rainwater from Growers for Grace is working with the researchers to determine what carbon sources are best to use for anaerobic soil disinfestation. Chicken litter and molasses, and cotton seed meal are carbon sources used in the study. Finding new carbon sources could help growers adjust to supply chain issues and provide them with the carbon they need, she said.

“We’re trying to determine what makes a good carbon source,” Rainwater said. “To do this, we’re going back to the basics and finding what is one grower’s waste is another grower’s input.”

As for weeds, Cutulle said nutsedge is a “driver weed” in watermelon. Several control measures can be used for this weed including herbicides, stale seedbed technique, solarization, polyethylene mulch system and cover crops. To find out more about Cutulle’s research, visit the Clemson College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences webpage Weed ID and Biology.

Pollinator points

If using honey bees to pollinate watermelon plants, place hives in fields when plants are actively blooming.

Proper pollination is another important tool for successful watermelon production. Ben Powell, Clemson Extension Apiculture and Pollinator Program coordinator at the Pee Dee REC, said using suitable pollinators is important for cucurbits. Honey bees are not the best pollinators for watermelon.

“Honey bees are used to pollinate watermelons and other cucurbits, but they are not highly attracted to watermelon flowers,” Powell said. “To get honey bees to pollinate watermelons, growers need to control competing flowers in the field and wait to introduce the hives when the watermelon plants are actively blooming.”

Protecting pollinators is important and easy. Activities people can do to ensure pollinators are protected include planting native flowering plants to attract and benefit local pollinators, reducing mowing and allowing flowering groundcover to remain as forage for pollinators and limiting herbicide use.

For more information on pollinators and pollination contracts, growers can visit the South Carolina Beekeepers website: https://scstatebeekeepers.com/, or the United States Department of Agriculture’s website: https://www.usda.gov/pollinators.

Clemson Extension weather network

Weather knowledge is something else that can benefit growers and lack of weather data available to South Carolina growers led to the creation of a statewide weather monitoring network. Chris Thomas, Clemson Extension state weather station technician located at the Sandhill REC, talked about the weather system.

Chris Thomas, Clemson Extension weather station technician, talks about the statewide weather monitoring network.

“Clemson Extension agents and specialists realized the need for a weather monitoring network and a proposal was made to establish a statewide weather station infrastructure,” Thomas said. “The project’s goal was to establish a weather station in every county to help give real-time and historical weather data. A total of 50 stations have been installed with at least one in each of the state’s 46 counties.”

The project’s next step is to create a website to house the data. Once this website is built, calculators will be developed to help growers and agents make better recommendations based on actual weather data. These calculators will include weather data on rainfall, growing degrees and chill hours. Clemson University will work with strategic partners such as the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Climatology Office, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and the South Carolina Farm Bureau to collect and utilize statewide weather data to make better predictions and recommendations.

“This will help us forecast possible disease and/or pest outbreaks,” Thomas said. “South Carolina residents will benefit if we can predict these weather-related outbreaks.”

Gilbert Miller, Clemson Extension vegetable specialist and field day coordinator, said the ability to predict weather will be beneficial for South Carolina growers.

“The way I see this working for watermelon growers is that it will help show how many heat units have accumulated over a certain period,” Miller said. “This will help growers determine when their melons may be ripe so that they can plan for harvest, which will help the growers plan for labor, equipment and so on.”

Watermelon winner

In addition to educational information, field day events also included a contest for the biggest watermelon. Clemson alumnus Sidi Limehouse of Johns Island, South Carolina, garnered first place with a melon weighing 124 pounds. Limehouse credits his monster melons to the Sunn Hemp cover crop he grew on the same plot where he grew watermelons.

“I’ve been growing watermelons since I was a teenager,” said Limehouse who is now 83. “And I learn something new every year. I learned Sunn Hemp kills nematodes and provides a lot of biomass, so I thought I’d try it and it seems to have worked.”

Limehouse isn’t content winning with a 124-pound watermelon. Next year, he hopes to bring a 150-pound watermelon and then, a 200-pound watermelon the following year. In addition to growing a Sunn Hemp cover crop, Limehouse said he takes care of his melons.

“I test my soil to be sure it has the correct nutrients,” Limehouse said. “Then, if it needs fertilizer, I make sure I apply the correct amount. I also give my melons lots of water and make sure the soil has the correct amount of carbon.”

Limehouse graduated from Clemson with a degree in agricultural engineering. He started his career growing corn and soybeans on the family farm but eventually transitioned from row crops to truck farming. Today, he operates Rosebank Farms on Johns Island, South Carolina, where he produces fruits, vegetables, flowers and herbs.

Extreme heat impacting Lowcountry farmers

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry farmers are working through the high temperatures and hoping the impacts don’t cost them.At Rosebank Farms on Johns Island, owner Sidi Limehouse says so far, the problems aren’t detrimental but depending on what August brings, more issues could arise.“High 80s are fine, but when you get into the 90s, 95s, that affects all the vegetables. It cuts down on the volume, some things on the quality,” said Limehouse.Squash and sweet corn are two crops being impac...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry farmers are working through the high temperatures and hoping the impacts don’t cost them.

At Rosebank Farms on Johns Island, owner Sidi Limehouse says so far, the problems aren’t detrimental but depending on what August brings, more issues could arise.

“High 80s are fine, but when you get into the 90s, 95s, that affects all the vegetables. It cuts down on the volume, some things on the quality,” said Limehouse.

Squash and sweet corn are two crops being impacted at Rosebank Farms.

A late planting of sweet corn on a few of the 100 acres of the farm isn’t expected to yield but a third of what was planted.

Limehouse says that’s partially due to low wind, which helps populate the corn, as well as heat. More specifically, a lack of pollination because of high temperatures.

“You get over 90 degrees and sweet corn and field corn just doesn’t pollinate,” he said. “We rely on about 20 hives and they don’t like the heat either. So what they’ll do is stay in their hives and fan it just to keep the young ones cool. That does affect some of the squash.”

Rosebank Farms doesn’t have an irrigation system so they rely on rain and knowledge of the land. That’s where Limehouse’s six decades of experience farming the land comes in.

There is high and low land on the farm, that Limehouse and his team strategically plant depending on a crop’s ability to handle a dryer environment.

“We plant watermelons and stuff on the high land, but things like okra, peppers, and tomatoes, we select low land and so far it’s worked out fine for us.”

If the heat wasn’t enough of a problem facing farmers, they are also feeling major impacts from inflation. The price of fertilizer has skyrocketed.

“Last year it was 600 dollars a ton, this year it’s 1200,” said Limehouse.

On top of that, the price of fuel is also cutting into profits. Rosebank Farms has a farm stand several miles away from the farm itself where fresh fruits and vegetables are sold. Limehouse says they also participate in local farmers’ markets as well as one in Columbia and use machinery to plant and harvest.

When asked how Rosebank handles the rising costs, Limehouse says the farm incurs it.

Despite the seemingly stressful impacts of heat and inflation, Limehouse says he’s hopeful for cooler temperatures and cheaper materials soon but for now, the show must go on.

“We just go with the flow.”

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