Sullivan’s Island

Car Window tintingin Sullivan's Island, SC

Troop-Films-LLC-phone-number 843-732-4325

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Certified paint protection film installation

Troop Films has been installing paint protection film for over 4 years now, and we are always improving our techniques.

Auto Tint Shop Sullivan's Island, SC

Trust the Troop Car Window
Tinting Difference

 Paint Protection Sullivan's Island, SC

In today's hectic, always-on-the-go world, having a car is essential for transportation around the city. It's hard to imagine life without a car. Without them, you wouldn't be able to make it to work, the grocery store, the laundromat, or important events like your children's sports events. Having a vehicle is a necessity these days because we use them so much, but many car owners don't make strides to protect their investment or what might be inside that investment.

Aside from purchasing an extended warranty for your car, one of the best ways to protect your car is with professional vehicle window tinting in Sullivan's Island, SC. What a warranty won't do, however, is boost curb appeal, reduce sun glare, block harmful radiation, protect your valuables, and provide privacy 24-hours a day.

At Troop Films LLC, we specialize in the finest ceramic window tints and certified paint protection films in South Carolina. We have been installing tints and paint protection film for several years and are always improving our techniques. As true window tinting experts, we have had the pleasure of working on so many different types of vehicles - from multi-million-dollar sports cars to junkers barely worth a grand. Doing so has allowed owner and certified installer Stephon Troop to refine his window tinting game and master techniques like clear bra installation. Today, he has a full-service team behind him, ready and waiting to serve loyal customers just like you.

Unlike some of our competitors, we take meticulous steps to ensure we provide the best work possible on your vehicle. We don't believe in taking shortcuts just to save a few cents. Instead, we go the extra mile to ensure all our customers are satisfied, whether it's completing special request projects or simply taking the time to ensure our work is done right. Whether you own a vintage Ferrari or a busted-up Ford, we aim to provide the highest quality car window tinting around.

When we say we're detail-oriented, we mean it. Here are just a few reasons why customers choose Troop Films for their car window tinting in South Carolina:

  • We remove vehicle parts like blinker covers to ensure dirt and grime aren't trapped.
  • We use computers to make sure your tint or coating is installed properly and precisely.
  • We remove emblems and badges so that we can wrap underneath them, giving your car more protection.
  • We wrap all edges of our ceramic window tints, so your job is seamless, and your tint remains effective year-round.

Curious about how we protect so many cars in South Carolina and the metro Sullivan's Island area? Expertise, customer service, and affordable prices are just the start. Our excellence starts at the top - here are a few words from Troop Films owner, Stephon Troop.

SERVICE AREAS

Meet Your Certified Vehicle Window Tinting Installer

Stephon and his wife, both originally from the chilly state of Pennsylvania, moved to Sullivan's Island, SC, for the warm beach weather and friendly Lowcountry residents.

Though Stephon now has many years of car window tinting under his belt, his training was completed under one of the best car window tint installers in the United States. Installing window tints, paint protection films, and ceramic coatings alongside during this time helped Stephon learn all the techniques and tricks needed to succeed. After training up north, Stephon continued to learn in Texas, where he became a certified paint protection and window tint installer. Since that time, Stephon has mastered even more car protection techniques to offer his customers a comprehensive list of services.

 Auto Tint Sullivan's Island, SC

Car Window Tinting
in Sullivan's Island, SC

Here is a simple truth: not all vehicle window tinting services are equal. Sure, you could spend a few bucks on a DIY window tinting kit, but going this route almost guarantees trouble. From unsightly fading to film bubbles, these offer the bare minimum in protection. With subpar quality, these kits also peel very quickly, causing you to spend more money to re-apply or have your tint professionally installed.

Speaking of window tinting services, few companies in South Carolina combine professional applications with the highest quality window tint film available. That's what sets Troop Films apart from other window tinting businesses - quality film, expert application, meticulous attention to detail, and the best customer service available.

Unlike some of our competitors, we use SunTek ceramic window tinting film, which is among the best in the industry. This technologically advanced product line provides outstanding, top-of-the-line films. With ceramic technology, infrared rejection and solar performance are enhanced, resulting in a non-metal construction that doesn't cause interference with portable or onboard electronic devices.

Our SunTek ceramic tint options come in a range of nine darkness levels. Each shade of tint has an ultra-attractive appearance, is non-reflective, and helps prevent color changes. With this fantastic film, you, your passengers, and your vehicle's interior are protected from 99% of UV rays from the sun. With outstanding infrared and heat rejection properties, your vehicle's interior comfort remains cooler and more comfortable all year long.

 Tint Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Most Common Reasons to Tint
Your Vehicle's Windows

Here are just a few of the most common reasons why South Carolina vehicle owners choose Troop Films for window tinting:

Privacy

Privacy

When we ask our customers why they want to tint their windows, privacy is often first on their list. When you begin to think about it, it makes sense. Why allow other drivers to invade your privacy when you can keep prying eyes off of your identity and personal belongings? It's not unreasonable to want privacy for you and your family while you're driving. You never know who you will pull up next to at a red light, and with our vehicle window tinting services in Sullivan's Island, SC, they don't have to know you either.

Style

Style

There's something inherently cool about having your windows tinted. Even if you're not trying to impress anyone with your car, having your windows tinted helps give it a refined, modern look, which enhances curb appeal. If you're getting tired of the way your car or truck's exterior looks, spice it up a little and bring it into Troop Films for professional window tinting. We think you will be happy with the results.

Comfort

Comfort

Have you ever sat down in your vehicle in the middle of summer, after it's been sitting outside all day? It feels like your car has turned into an oven. Sometimes, it can get so hot in your car that it's hard to grip the steering wheel. As you probably already know, summers in South Carolina can be brutal. When the temperatures heat up in the Lowcountry, your vehicle traps most of that heat, causing interior temperatures to reach unsafe levels. But when you have your windows tinted with Troop Films, your car will stay cooler in the spring and summer. With ceramic film, glare from headlights and streetlights is also reduced, meaning you can see easier without having to strain your eyes. More comfort and more safety - what's not to love?

Health and Safety

Health and Safety

When you think about car window tinting, most folks don't think about the health and safety benefits involved. But when it comes to you and your passengers, safety should be top of your list. High temps in your vehicle, usually caused by UV rays, are a safety concern not only for your skin and eyes but for your car's safety mechanisms. This is especially true for your airbags, which can be damaged and left inoperable when interior temperatures are high enough. Obviously, that's a huge safety risk.

Fading Dashboard

Fading Dashboard

Over time, your vehicle's dashboard will take a beating when your car is left out in the sun. The combo of harmful UV rays and high heat can ruin dashboard materials, leaving them cracked, faded, and in need of repair. Fixing your dashboard can be a costly endeavor. However, doing so can be avoided with high-quality ceramic tints from Troop Films.

 Ceramic Window Tint Sullivan's Island, SC

Certified Installer

Benefits of Vehicle Window Tinting
in Sullivan's Island, SC

If you're still on the fence about ceramic window tinting for your vehicle, consider
the following benefits of our SunTek films:

 Ceramic Coatings Sullivan's Island, SC
  • Unrestricted Communications - some window films contain traces of metals, which can cause interference with devices. Our metal-free films won't interfere with your cell phone, GPS, satellite radio, or other electronic devices that you use while driving.
  • Resistant to Color Changes - Our technologically-advanced window films are scientifically created to give you an attractive, non-reflective appearance without color fading.
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty - You read that right - when you buy window tints from Troop Films, your products are covered by the manufacturer against peeling, adhesive failures, changes in color, cracking, and delamination. Some restrictions do apply.
  • Precise Installation - When you work with Troop Films, you can have peace of mind knowing your window tint will be applied seamlessly and accurately. That's because we have access to core pattern-cutting software that trims your window film tightly. With our precise installation, you can rest easy knowing your tint will fit the make, model, and year of your vehicle like a glove.

The Ultimate Protection: Car
Window Tinting and Paint
Protection Film in Sullivan's Island, SC

They say the first cut is always the deepest, and that's certainly true when it comes to your vehicle. Few things are as frustrating as getting out of your car, only to realize that a stray rock has dented your favorite car or truck. Dents and scratches from road debris like rocks and even acids from bugs all take their toll on your vehicle's overall appearance and value. Along with UV rays, "road rash" from winter salt, sand, rocks, pebbles, branches, and more will compromise your vehicle's integrity and can mean lower resale value.

If you're looking for total protection from heat and UV rays as well as road debris, we recommend car window tinting in Sullivan's Island, SC along with our paint protection film application. Paint protection film, also called your vehicle's clear bra, provides a shield of protection from road rash, preserves your car's paint job, increases its longevity, and can increase its resale value. Paint protection film is very useful for everyday use, especially if you're driving on the highway or simply want to protect your favorite car. Clear bras are also helpful for work vehicles, which often receive dents and scratches due to the nature of their work.

At Troop Film, our SunTek paint protection film is among the highest quality films in the industry. Common application areas include:

  • Vehicle Paint
  • Door Handles
  • Headlights
  • Rear Fenders
  • Front Bumpers
  • Mirrors
  • Hoods
 PPF Sullivan's Island, SC

Our paint protection films are completely reinvented products that merge the hydrophobicity of ceramic with premium, self-healing paint protection film. Common benefits of having your vehicle protected with paint film include:

01

Endurance

Your car's finish will stay flawless and fresh with our car protection films, which shield against salt, rocks, insects, and other debris.

02

Resistance

Our HydroResist top-coat protection boosts your vehicle's stain resistance by limiting dirt and water accumulation on your protection film's surface.

03

Self-Healing

It sounds too good to be true, but our films really do heal themselves by using the heat from the sun or your vehicle's engine.

04

Look Great

Our paint protection films are available in high gloss and matte finishes, leaving your car with outstanding optics and clarity.

Have Questions? We've Got Answers!

In addition to the highest-quality car window tinting products, our customer service team excels at answering any questions you may have. We're here to help in any way and can even help determine which kind of protection is best for your vehicle. Call, text, or fill out the inquiry form on our website. Before you know it, your car will be super-stylish and even safer to drive with the help of Troop Films LLC.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Co-Op Frosé and Eatery to open in North Chattanooga

A popular cafe at Sullivan's Island near Charleston, South Carolina, is bringing its beachfront atmosphere, flavored frose, dollar coffee drinks, gourmet sandwiches and a variety of breakfast entrees to Chattanooga's Riverview area next month.The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery plans to open a 1,000-square-foot storefront in the Riverview shopping center on Dorchester Road in the first week of July. Although the newest Co-Op Frosé will be more than 400 miles from the ocean, the Riverview store will still feature a beachfront vaca...

A popular cafe at Sullivan's Island near Charleston, South Carolina, is bringing its beachfront atmosphere, flavored frose, dollar coffee drinks, gourmet sandwiches and a variety of breakfast entrees to Chattanooga's Riverview area next month.

The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery plans to open a 1,000-square-foot storefront in the Riverview shopping center on Dorchester Road in the first week of July. Although the newest Co-Op Frosé will be more than 400 miles from the ocean, the Riverview store will still feature a beachfront vacation atmosphere with both indoor and outdoor seating.

"It's a very laid-back beach cafe," said Jenny Beckham, a marketing director for Co-Op Frosé. "Some people come in for the coffee and some come in for the frose and some for our gourmet sandwiches and other items."

A frose is a sweet alcoholic drink made from frozen wine, fruit and a little sweetener, usually whirled together in a blender, Beckham said.

She said the owners see Chattanooga as a growing market similar to Charleston, Austin, Texas, and Nashville and picked the Riverview location "because we love this area and the surrounding restaurants."

From its start a decade ago in Charleston County, South Carolina, the growing business has added cafes around Charleston at the Isle of Palms, Kiawah and downtown Charleston and is expanding this year to Summerville, South Carolina, and two locations in the Nashville area, in addition to Chattanooga.

"Chattanooga is such an amazing city, and we cannot wait to be a part of this community," owner Jess Patterson said in an announcement of its newest cafe. "We have met so many great people during this time and are looking forward to spending even more time in Chattanooga doing our favorite thing: slinging frose and delicious sandwiches."

Similar to other Co-Op Frosé storefronts, the Riverview unit will also have a frose trailer for parties, weddings and other special events to serve its drinks and food on location.

The Co-Op menu features local coffee, gourmet sandwiches, wine, beer and eight flavors of the cafe's specialty drink, frose. The Co-Op Chattanooga also will serve the business's ever-popular Cali turkey made with turkey, bacon, avocado, sprouts, tomato and herb cream cheese on toasted wheat, along with delicious breakfast options like whipped ricotta toast with local honey.

The store will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week, Beckham said.

Contact Dave Flessner at [email protected] or at 423-757-6340. Follow him on Twitter @dflessner1.

'Do not rezone that golf course'; citizens say facility needed; change may also threaten airport

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision."I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."...

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision.

"I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."

Council was scheduled to give second reading to rezone the golf club property from forest agriculture to residential general.

American Star Development SC, LLC of Sullivan's Island has requested the two parcels making up the Holly Hill Golf Club at 9159 Old State Road be rezoned.

The parcels are a combined 93.59 acres. The property is about one mile southeast of the Town of Holly Hill.

ASC has said the company has no specific plans for the property at the moment. It is exploring zoning opportunities to better determine future development plans.

County planning officials say the owner has expressed his intentions to close the golf course.

Several attempts to reach the owner of the property, as listed on the rezoning application, have been unsuccessful.

County attorney D'Anne Haydel said the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission notified the county it has two objections with rezoning the property, specially due to safety and noise concerns.

Haydel noted the SCAC is a governmental entity and needs a hearing.

"There is a statute that indicates we need to get back with the Aeronautics Commission within 30 days with a line-by-line response to why it is safe and why it won't be noisy," Haydel said.

In light of the new information, council unanimously voted to table the matter and to send it back to the County Planning Commission for further study on the SCAC concerns.

Prior to the council's vote, VanBogart noted with the number of housing developments planned -- the town is going to grow from 700 homes to 3,000 homes in the next two years -- there will be a need to have recreational opportunities for residents coming into the area.

"We want to keep our golf course," VanBogart said. "It is very much integral to our town."

VanBogart said while the town owned the golf course for years, it has been sold to a private developer who has "plans to tear it (golf course) down and make it homes."

"I am all about private property rights," VanBogart said, but noted there has not been full disclosure from the property's ownership about intentions for the property. "We were all caught completely blindsided."

John Hill, speaking on behalf of his son, John Paul, who keeps a plane at the airport, says the airport is a "gem."

"I think there is hardly any left in South Carolina that are a grass strip and private," Hill said. "This is going back to the past in America when pilots flew out of grass strips."

Hill said the airport is a great educational tool for young generations and has flight opportunities for school-aged children as well as instruction on airplane mechanics as part of the national Experimental Aircraft Association.

"It is a page of history that is going to disappear," Hill said. "I think it is a unique distinction. That airport can lead to so many things."

Robert Gootman also expressed his support of the Holly Hill Airport.

"There are too many airports that close and Holly Hill has a very unique asset in that airport and it will grow along with the community," Gootman said, noting the airport can be used in cases of emergency, training of pilots and recreational uses. "If that golf course turns into a housing development, that airport will be shut down. It will be too dangerous to land airplanes there because you will have houses right there in front of the flight path."

Ken Mackey also has an airplane at the Holly Hill airport.

"It will close the airport," Mackey said. "You can't have airplanes coming 200 feet over the house."

Mackey said subdivisions alongside the airport are possible.

He has contacted the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association national group, which is putting a package together to possibly turn the airport into an air park where houses alongside the airport have hangars.

"There are no hangars available from Holly Hill to the coast to hangar your aircraft," Mackey said. "There is demand there for this type of development ... and keep the asset as an airport."

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

What is the record high temperature for each South Carolina county?

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 d...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.

Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.

The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 degrees, recorded on Jan. 21, 1985, in Caesars Head.

High temperatures are expected to continue in South Carolina this week following a heat advisory issued on Tuesday.

Wednesday, temperatures were expected to reach a high in the lower 90s, with weather cooling to the lower 70s at night in Horry County, according to the National Weather Service. The heat index could possibly reach 100 to 105 degrees on Friday in southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina.

On the cooler side, South Carolina’s 24-hour snowfall record was reached on Feb. 9-10, 1973, in Rimini, with 24 inches, according to the National Centers for Environmental Information. The deepest snow was recorded on Feb. 18, 1969, in Ceasars Head, at 29 inches.

The most rain was on Sept. 16, 1999, in Myrtle Beach, at 14.8 inches within 24 hours. Jocasee set a record for the most rain in a year in 2018, at 123.45 inches.

Here are the lowest temperatures recorded in each South Carolina county, according to the South Carolina State Climatology Office:

Abbeville County

Location: Calhoun Falls

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 8, 1925

Aiken County

Location: Aiken

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Allendale County

Location: Allendale

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Anderson County

Location: Anderson

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 29, 1952

Bamberg County

Location: Bamberg

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 24, 1952

Barnwell County

Location: Blackville

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Beaufort County

Location: Yemasse

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 3, 1985

Berkeley County

Location: Jamestown

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Calhoun County

Location: St. Matthews

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: July 27, 1914

Charleston County

Location: Sullivans Island

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: June 26, 1952

Cherokee County

Location: Ninety Nine Islands

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Chester County

Location: Chester

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 31, 1983

Chesterfield County

Location: Cheraw

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 19, 1986

Clarendon County

Location: Manning

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Colleton County

Location: Walterboro

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Aug. 17, 1954

Darlington County

Location: Darlington

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Dillon County

Location: Dillon

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Dorchester County

Location: Summerville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Sept. 21, 1925

Edgefield County

Location: Johnston

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Fairfield County

Location: Winsboro

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 22, 1926

Florence County

Location: Florence

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Georgetown County

Location: Georgetown

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: June 30, 1990

Greenville County

Location: Hunts Bridge

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 10, 2007

Greenwood County

Location: Greenwood

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 19, 1913

Hampton County

Location: Hampton

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 13, 1980

Horry County

Location: Loris

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1952

Jasper County

Location: Ridgeland

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1950

Kershaw County

Location: Camden

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: June 28, 1954

Lancaster County

Location: Kershaw

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1926

Laurens County

Location: Laurens

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: June 22, 1925

Lee County

Location: Bishopville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1940

Lexington County

Location: Columbia Metropolitan Airport

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: June 28, 2012

Marion County

Location: Marion

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Marlboro County

Location: McColl

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 9, 2007

McCormick County

Location: Clarkhill

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 29, 1987

Newberry County

Location: Little Mountain

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 21, 1952

Oconee County

Location: Walhalla

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 7, 1925

Orangeburg County

Location: Orangeburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 2, 1999

Pickens County

Location: Pickens

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Richland County

Location: USC Columbia

Temperature: 113 degrees

Date: June 29, 2012

Saluda County

Location: Saluda

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 1, 1912

Spartanburg County

Location: Spartanburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

Sumter County

Location: Wedgefield

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Union County

Location: Santuck

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Williamsburg County

Location: Kingstree

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

York County

Location: Winthrop University

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 12, 1930

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Loggerheads Continue To Lay Eggs By The Dozen

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye NewsAt last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a...

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News

At last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a nearby dune where they would not be destroyed by the tide or emergency vehicles. Subsequent nests on the Isle of Palms have been laid at the 5A Access Path, the 9A Access Path and in Dewees Inlet near the 17 tee of the Links Golf Course. This fourth IOP nest is now incubating near the Property Owners’ Beach House in Wild Dunes. On Sullivan’s Island, the first nest was laid very close to the Breach Inlet Bridge at the Hunley Memorial Park. This is not even in the area where our volunteers patrol, but others reported seeing the tracks there on May 20. Those eggs were taken to Station 26 to be relocated.

This was an unusually large clutch of 156 eggs. The average number they lay is around 120 eggs. The second SI nest of the season was found near Station 15 not far from Fort Moultrie by Raye Ann Osborne and Joanne Staton on May 24. It is now incubating just northeast of the Station 16 Access Path. In South Carolina, the first nest of the season was laid at Lighthouse Island in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge where more loggerheads nest than anywhere north of Jacksonville, Florida.

As of May 26 there were 923 nests in our state. We are off to a good start and are looking forward to having a very good season. We are also protecting most of our nests from coyote predation with heavy plastic screening.

Here are season reminders that we would like everyone to be aware of to have a safe beach for our loggerheads in 2022:

• Lights Out at Dusk. Any lights that can be seen from the beach should be turned off from dusk to dawn between May 1 and Oct. 31. This is the law on both islands.

• Fill in Holes. Any hole on the beach can trap small hatchlings and also large nesting females.

• Turn off flashlights & don’t use flash photography. If you see a nesting turtle on the beach, stay back at least 50 feet and do not disturb her.

Report any stranded turtles, dead or alive, to (843) 697-8733 or (843) 886-6522. If it has orange paint on it, it has been documented and is awaiting burial. Follow the season at bergwerfgraphics.com or join us on Facebook at Island Turtle Team IOP & SI South Carolina.

Disclaimer:

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